Category Archives: Art History

Exhibition on Alfred Flechtheim

Alfred Flechtheim, the art dealer who brought Picasso to Berlin and founded the magazine Querschnitt, was one of the most important figures of Weimar Germany’s cultural scene. 80 years after his death, the Georg Kolbe Museum has put on a show about his life and work, featuring works by the artists he represented: Continue reading

Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919-1933

august_sander_secretary_at_west_german_radio_in_cologne_1931_printed_1992A new exhibition at Tate Liverpool shows portraits of Weimar Germans by August Sander and Otto Dix: ‘Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919–1933 presents the faces of Germany between the two world wars told through the eyes of painter Otto Dix (1891–1969) and photographer August Sander (1876–1964) – two artists whose works document the radical extremes of the country in this period.   Continue reading

Exhibition on Jazz Age fashion

A fashion illustration showing models wearing various party dresses.     Date: 20th June 1928

A fashion illustration showing models wearing various party dresses. Date: 20th June 1928

The Fashion & Textile Museum in London is currently showing clothing and fashion photography from the 1920s, “a glittering display of haute couture and ready-to-wear fashion from 1919 to 1929”. According to the exhibition catalogue, “women’s clothing in the 1920s reflected dizzying social change on an unprecedented scale. From Paris and London to New York and Hollywood, the decade following the Great War offered the modern woman a completely new style of dressing.”

The exhibition programme includes Charleston dance classes and a talk by Caroline Cox about “1920s Hair & Beauty”. Continue reading

It’s Weimar Time Again!

Berlin_Metropolis_1024x1024Over the past weeks, three new exhibitions have opened on two different continents, almost at the same time, that put Weimar culture back into the spotlight of wider public attention.
In New York, Berlin Metropolis: 1918-1933 at the Neue Galerie “explores the city using a multi-media approach, revealing this complex period through painting, drawing, sculpture, collage, photography, architecture, film, and fashion.” In LA, New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic, 1919-1933, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art claims to be “the first comprehensive exhibition in the United States to explore the dominant artistic trends of this period.” Meanwhile, in Berlin, Tanz auf dem Vulkan. Das Berlin der Zwanziger Jahre im Spiegel der Künste at the Stadtmuseum Berlin promises to deliver for the first time a “comprehensive overview” of Berlin’s status as the European centre of the avant-garde in Europe during this period. Continue reading

“Dancing on the Volcano” exhibition

gem_85-21_grunwaldtThe myth of the “Roaring Twenties” and of 1920s Berlin is rearing its head again. From September, the Stadtmuseum Berlin hosts the exhibition “Dancing on the Volcano. The Berlin of the Twenties as Reflected in the Arts” aiming at showcasing “the mood and social climate in the 1920s, particularly in the pulsating metropolis of Berlin”.

Sadly, there seems to be no historical awareness of the “legend of the Twenties” (in Helmuth Plessner’s words) and its retrospective, nostalgic quality.

Research on Weimar on LISA portal

logo_LISA, the online portal of the Gerda Henkel Foundation, offers two very interesting video series about the Weimar Republic. The lecture series Dimensionen der “Machtergreifung” – Von der Weimarer Republik zum NS-Staat features talks by esteemed German experts on the rise of the Nazis in Weimar Germany, including Stefanie Schüler-Spingorum on anti-Semitic violence 1932-34.

The 9-part documentary The New Objectivity in Dresden introduces and presents the research project of the same name, based at the Dresden State Art Collection, from its initial inception to the final exhibition.

CfP: Weimar’s ‘Other’: Visual culture in Germany after 1918

Weimar’s ‘Other’: Visual culture in Germany after 1918

University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

9-11 April 2015

Paper proposal deadline: 10 November 2014

We welcome paper proposals for the following Session at the Association of Art Historians Annual Conference, to be held at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK from 9-11 April 2015. Continue reading