Category Archives: Visual Culture

Exhibition on Jazz Age fashion

A fashion illustration showing models wearing various party dresses.     Date: 20th June 1928

A fashion illustration showing models wearing various party dresses. Date: 20th June 1928

The Fashion & Textile Museum in London is currently showing clothing and fashion photography from the 1920s, “a glittering display of haute couture and ready-to-wear fashion from 1919 to 1929”. According to the exhibition catalogue, “women’s clothing in the 1920s reflected dizzying social change on an unprecedented scale. From Paris and London to New York and Hollywood, the decade following the Great War offered the modern woman a completely new style of dressing.”

The exhibition programme includes Charleston dance classes and a talk by Caroline Cox about “1920s Hair & Beauty”. Continue reading

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Karl Schenker exhibition

csm_plakatmotiv_schenker_40642828ebThe Museum Ludwig in Cologne is hosting an exhibition of works by Karl Schenker, one of Weimar’s most famous society photographers: “Ev­ery­body who was any­body had their por­trait tak­en in his Ber­lin stu­dio on the fa­mous Kur­fürs­ten­damm.” Many thanks to Dorothy Price for drawing our attention to this fabulous show! Continue reading

Pamela Hutchinson on the History of Silent Film

The journalist Pamela Hutchinson is regularly writing about the  history of silent film and its stars. For her column “Silent but deadly!“, appearing fortnightly in The Guardian, she has covered Clara Bow, Lotte Reiniger, and Rudolph Valentino. She also writes for Sight&Sound and Silent London. An interesting resource for any scholars of silent cinema!

Beyond Berlin: Working-class photography in the Ruhr area

Vor der Westfalenhütte, Dortmund, 1928-1933

Vor der Westfalenhütte, Dortmund, 1928-1933

The Ruhrmuseum Essen is currently hosting an exhibition of Erich Grisar’s documentary photography from 1928-1933. Grisar is primarily known as a working-class writer and journalist, and this new show puts his photography work centre-stage for the first time. Spiegel Online features a selection of photos from the exhibition.

It’s Weimar Time Again!

Berlin_Metropolis_1024x1024Over the past weeks, three new exhibitions have opened on two different continents, almost at the same time, that put Weimar culture back into the spotlight of wider public attention.
In New York, Berlin Metropolis: 1918-1933 at the Neue Galerie “explores the city using a multi-media approach, revealing this complex period through painting, drawing, sculpture, collage, photography, architecture, film, and fashion.” In LA, New Objectivity: Modern German Art in the Weimar Republic, 1919-1933, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art claims to be “the first comprehensive exhibition in the United States to explore the dominant artistic trends of this period.” Meanwhile, in Berlin, Tanz auf dem Vulkan. Das Berlin der Zwanziger Jahre im Spiegel der Künste at the Stadtmuseum Berlin promises to deliver for the first time a “comprehensive overview” of Berlin’s status as the European centre of the avant-garde in Europe during this period. Continue reading

Research on Weimar on LISA portal

logo_LISA, the online portal of the Gerda Henkel Foundation, offers two very interesting video series about the Weimar Republic. The lecture series Dimensionen der “Machtergreifung” – Von der Weimarer Republik zum NS-Staat features talks by esteemed German experts on the rise of the Nazis in Weimar Germany, including Stefanie Schüler-Spingorum on anti-Semitic violence 1932-34.

The 9-part documentary The New Objectivity in Dresden introduces and presents the research project of the same name, based at the Dresden State Art Collection, from its initial inception to the final exhibition.

New book on Ullstein publishing house

9783110337211Ullstein was, without a doubt, one of the most important cultural and political actors in Weimar Germany. As the country’s biggest book publisher and the home of such influential publications as Vossische Zeitung, BZ am Mittag and Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, the company exerted a major influence on contemporary culture. A staunch proponent of liberal politics and the democratic system, it was viewed by many as one of the pillars of the Weimar Republic. Not surprisingly, it quickly became a target for Nazi attacks and was one of the first Jewish companies to be “Aryanized” after 1933. Continue reading